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The Magic Detective. Peter Grant ("Rivers of Lo...
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Bachelor Thesis from the year 2014 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,1, University of Bonn (Institut für Anglistik, Amerikanistik und Keltologie), language: English, abstract: This paper foremost deals with the question in which ways the magic detective Peter Grant is differentiated from the non-magic detective, that is to say Sherlock Holmes, and in which ways the world of the protagonist is modified by the supernatural. Representatives for the two different approaches will be "A Scandal in Bohemia" (first published in 1891) as well as "A Study in Scarlet" (first published in 1887) by Arthur Conan Doyle and Ben Aaronovitch's "Rivers of London". Even though there are many iconic detectives that could have served the purpose, Sherlock Holmes was chosen as he is something like a patron saint of detective fiction. Priestman states on that matter that "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes is the supreme 'character' of nineteenth-century detective fiction" (Detective Fiction 74). "A Scandal in Bohemia" was chosen here as it features a female culprit and it will be interesting to set the female role as presented in the short story against the one in the more recent novel by Aaronovitch. However, when referring to Sherlock Holmes, "A Study in Scarlet" will also be accounted for as this is the story where Watson first meets the legendary sleuth and thus the reader is described a lot of mannerisms of his through the eyes of the narrator. Peter Grant's story was selected as there is barely another novel at the time which features the supernatural next to the criminal in such a striking pattern. This assumption was made due to the fact that Peter Grant is a wizard and a police constable at the same time. Therefore it will be interesting to explore how this fact influences him and the world he lives in and also the distinction between the Victorian and the postmodern approach.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 28.10.2020
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Leading the Story via Misleading. Levels of Dec...
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Master's Thesis from the year 2017 in the subject Didactics - English - Literature, Works, grade: 1,3, University of Bonn (Anglistik, Amerikanistik und Keltologie), language: English, abstract: The introductory chapter provides a brief retrospection of the "Sherlock Holmes phenomenon" in Doyle's times and in our days. It also offers some important background information on the rise of detective-mystery stories and the socio-political circumstances that necessitated the emergence of a figure like Holmes in the literary scene. Chapter 2 elaborates on three different levels of deception in "The Hound of the Baskervilles". On one occasion, deception can be said to be synonymous to superstition because it results from lack of observation or sufficient scientific knowledge in order to explain the inexplicable. This type of deception is classified as such due to the constantly advancing scientific achievements, the questioning and decline of Christian faith during the Victorian era, the triumph of rationality over superstition and the more systematic examination of various peculiar phenomena. To a certain degree, Doyle represents all these because he is a man of science and knows how to "enlighten" or teach the public of his times by using scientific insights and some far-fetched observations and deductions which are performed by his hero. On another occasion, deception is bound to Watson's narrating style. Finally, the third and most explicit type is part of the story's plot. Holmes, on the one hand, lies to Watson and deceives him in order to confront the upcoming danger in utmost secrecy. There is no evil intention here. On the other hand, Jack Stapleton, who represents an impious fraud and wants to gain for his own sake deceives in order to fulfil his crime. His evil intentions render him the main source of deception by means of disguising himself, his wife and his hound so that they look much different than what they are in reality. Finally, chapter 3 provides some thoughts and conclusions about reading pleasure and reader expectations, but also some critical "rules" that pertain to the reader's involvement in the story. Those "rules" of the later Golden Age of detective fiction were proposed by famous authors, mainly Father Ronald Knox, Raymond Chandler and S. S. Vine, who talked about 'honesty' to the reader, various aesthetic values and the chance to enable a parallel solving of the mystery along with the detective. Nevertheless, a recent approach to this puzzle-solving aspect shows how impossible it is to solve Conan Doyle's mysteries by following certain clues and to arrive at fixed solutions. Examples are offered.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 28.10.2020
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Sherlock Holmes - One but not the same?
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Seminar paper from the year 2011 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, University of Bonn (Institut für Anglistik, Amerikanistik und Keltologie (IAAK)), language: English, abstract: 'Intriguing and memorable as some of the nineteenth-century detectives were, there is only one great detective' (Knight 2010: 55). When reading these few words everyone who is more or even less familiar with literature should know who these lines are dedicated to. The detective in question is of course Sherlock Holmes. This detective, who was brought to life by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1886 (cf Weller 1992: 11), has defined nineteenth-century crime fiction in a remarkable way. This present paper is dedicated to this great figure of detection.It is important to note, though, that Sherlock Holmes will not solely be dealt with as a literary figure but also as a movie character that has been embodied by several actors in over a hundred movies. This huge number of adaptations is a proof for the various interpretations one can apply when working with Arthur Conan Doyle's stories. The most important and famous movies will be briefly discussed in section 1.3.Some of the screenplays relate very closely to Doyle's stories and some show only marginal similarities to the literary original. However, this paper is mostly concerned with the latest film adaptation from the year 2009, titled Sherlock Holmes, directed by Guy Ritchie. This paper deals with the way the great detective is depicted in this modern movie. In what way did director Guy Ritchie take the stories from the nineteenth century as a guideline when creating his very own Sherlock Holmes embodied by Robert Downey Jr.? How much of the original great detective can be found in the film adaptation from 2009? These are the questions this papers aims at clarifying.Firstly, Sherlock Holmes is to be introduced by describing his role in the literary world in general and the significance he has had for British crime fiction in particular. Following this introduction, three exemplary Sherlock Holmes stories will be presented, among them of course the adventure in which Holmes first occurred, namely 'A Study in Scarlet' (cf Weller 1992: 11) After a short discussion of these three stories, and an outline as to how Sherlock Holmes is presented in these written works, the paper is turning its focus on the medium of film. The main focus lies on the comparison between the movie of 2009 and the stories by Doyle.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 28.10.2020
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Sherlock Holmes - One but not the same?
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Seminar paper from the year 2011 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, University of Bonn (Institut für Anglistik, Amerikanistik und Keltologie (IAAK)), language: English, abstract: 'Intriguing and memorable as some of the nineteenth-century detectives were, there is only one great detective' (Knight 2010: 55). When reading these few words everyone who is more or even less familiar with literature should know who these lines are dedicated to. The detective in question is of course Sherlock Holmes. This detective, who was brought to life by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1886 (cf Weller 1992: 11), has defined nineteenth-century crime fiction in a remarkable way. This present paper is dedicated to this great figure of detection.It is important to note, though, that Sherlock Holmes will not solely be dealt with as a literary figure but also as a movie character that has been embodied by several actors in over a hundred movies. This huge number of adaptations is a proof for the various interpretations one can apply when working with Arthur Conan Doyle's stories. The most important and famous movies will be briefly discussed in section 1.3.Some of the screenplays relate very closely to Doyle's stories and some show only marginal similarities to the literary original. However, this paper is mostly concerned with the latest film adaptation from the year 2009, titled Sherlock Holmes, directed by Guy Ritchie. This paper deals with the way the great detective is depicted in this modern movie. In what way did director Guy Ritchie take the stories from the nineteenth century as a guideline when creating his very own Sherlock Holmes embodied by Robert Downey Jr.? How much of the original great detective can be found in the film adaptation from 2009? These are the questions this papers aims at clarifying.Firstly, Sherlock Holmes is to be introduced by describing his role in the literary world in general and the significance he has had for British crime fiction in particular. Following this introduction, three exemplary Sherlock Holmes stories will be presented, among them of course the adventure in which Holmes first occurred, namely 'A Study in Scarlet' (cf Weller 1992: 11) After a short discussion of these three stories, and an outline as to how Sherlock Holmes is presented in these written works, the paper is turning its focus on the medium of film. The main focus lies on the comparison between the movie of 2009 and the stories by Doyle.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 28.10.2020
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